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My Camera missed Missouri’s Greatest Beauty

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I have been looking back and realized that I took quite a few great pictures in October that I never really got around to sharing. Of course, most of them are just candid little fun shots but there are a few that I am really proud of. Now that I’m knee deep in NaNoWriMo it seemed like a good time to go ahead and share them with all of you.

Of course, what makes me most sad is that our unseasonably warm weather persisted far too late in the year, and when the leaves did decide they were finally going to change color, they did so as they fell to the ground. Of course, that makes me a sad panda because one of the things that I love above all else about living in Missouri is that late September/early October here is the most beautiful thing I’ve ever witnessed. The changing of the trees from dark green to crossing the rainbow with vibrant shades is something special, and the diversity of trees is more prominent in Missouri than anywhere else.  We simply have better forests for leafing enthusiasts.

Sadly, this year we didn’t get that beauty, and I didn’t get to capture it on camera. I wasGEDC0253 blessed in capturing some other things, though. Primarily, I’m pretty lucky that my golden retriever, Abbey, is so photogenic. Really, I just point the camera at her and it makes me seem like I know something about “lighting” or “composition.” She’s just good at being photographed. There isn’t much more than that to it. I managed to get a couple of good pictures of her, especially when she was smiling happily. I’m convinced she only has two facial expressions, mopey and grinning. I guess she’s as bipolar as her owner.

The one picture I am more proud of than anything else, though, was a great image I got thanks to my mom. We had noticed a couple of weeks before that a caterpillar was making a cocoon on one of the flower pots on the back porch. She happened to be out there one day looking at it, and realized that it was translucent. She called me over and told me to grab my camera.

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I took several shots from different angles, but I think ultimately this one turned out the best. It was strange seeing through the little cocoon to the butterfly emerging inside, and even looking at the pictures it looks odd and sickly. However, even a couple of weeks after I took this picture, the cocoon was found empty. The pretty little butterfly inside had taken off for, who knows where.

After all, where do the butterflies go when they are done with their little cocoons?

I’ve heard they go to some place in Mexico. You know, one of those towns where the booze and food costs next to nothing and you can get cheap fireworks that might blow your hand off.

Yeah, butterflies are totally into that sort of thing.

Published by M.A. Brotherton

M.A. Brotherton is a writer, blogger, artist, and fat-kid from the suburbs of Kansas City, Missouri. He’s tasted a little bit of everything the Midwest has to offer, ranging from meth-tweaking rednecks in massive underground cave complexes to those legendary amber waves of grain. When he’s not writing, he spends most of his time screwing around on the internet.