Blog, Journal

Musical Nostalgia

Music is a big part of my life. It’s a definitely a huge part of my creative process. I have to admit that I’m actually easily duped into experiencing emotions I was experiencing by well-made music. It’s just infectious. They get under my skin and down deep into my soul. That is, of course, when I can stand listening to it.

As much is music actually affects me, my mood affects what I’m capable of withstanding without screaming bloodied murder. For example, if I’m in a decent mood, upbeat, hyper, happy, fun times will make me hyper and happy. But, if I’m in a soul and had dark mood, it will make me scream bloodied murder and hate the world even more.

Conversely, depressing music can pull me deeper into an emo spiral, or make me rant about how boring and sad it is.

I suppose what I’m saying is that music and move me a couple of notches on the spectrum, but not fix me where I’m broken.

There is something to be said about the music that I grew up listening to and its effects on me over the long haul of my life. I was adolescent in the mid-90s between the fall of grunge in the rise of nu metal. It was a good time for music. But it was also a depressing time for music.

It was the air of some of the greatest pop musicians of all time. Destiny’s Child, TLC, and yes, even Britney Spears. But, it was the alternative rock that really got me going. The Verve, Cranberries, Wallflowers, and Oasis were just a few of the angry, bitter songsters floating on my periphery.

Can one song ever so perfectly summarize an entire generation than Bittersweet Symphony? The Freshman? Zero?

I swear, if it wasn’t for Dave Grohl, my entire generation would never have survived high school.

I guess he threw a Monkey Wrench into our depressing self-indulgence.

Don’t get me wrong, there was a lot of upbeat happy music, too. I mean, for every Brick we had a Banditos. There’s a Little Birdhouse in Your Soul for every song Radiohead ever put out there.

Of course, I was the time when all of us run Prozac and having a bad day get you diagnosed as bipolar disorder, so what do they expect for music?

Maybe I’m being too hard on the 90s. Sure, there was some darkness proving, we also had boy bands.

You know what? I just remembered Fred Durst. Please forget everything I said. No one should remember the music of the 90s. Goddamn Limp Bizkit.

Published by M.A. Brotherton

M.A. Brotherton is a writer, blogger, artist, and fat-kid from the suburbs of Kansas City, Missouri. He’s tasted a little bit of everything the Midwest has to offer, ranging from meth-tweaking rednecks in massive underground cave complexes to those legendary amber waves of grain. When he’s not writing, he spends most of his time screwing around on the internet.