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So what’s the deal with Prop B?

Abbey is not amused.

The Wording of Prop B – The “Puppy Mill” Proposition

Shall the Missouri Law be amended to:

  • require large-scale dog breeding operations to provide each dog under their care with sufficient food, clean water, housing and space; necessary veterinary care; regular exercise and adequate rest between breeding cycles;
  • prohibit any breeder from having more than 50 breeding dogs for the purpose of selling their puppies as pets; and
  • create a misdemeanor crime of “puppy mill cruelty” for any violations?

At its face value, one might question why this even needs to be voted on. Obviously, if you think like I do, than abusing your dog should be punishable from a quick, immediate, and publicly humiliating execution. But then again, I’m a dog guy, and I might be a little more extreme in some of my quirks than some people find acceptable in public…

Now a seemingly simple issue like this is rather deceptive. In political talk, we tend to take things at their most charged emotional value on the surface. The argument over Missouri Prop B might be something along the lines of this:

“Vote for Prop B! Its to save the Puppies!”

“But, couldn’t that particular bill set a dangerous precident about government agricultural regulations without solving the problems that actually exist?”

“Fuck you, dog hater!”

/Scene

Actually, we’ve been pretty fortunate, that this particular issue hasn’t degraded into the emotional drama that it could have fallen victim to. Really, this issue has two valid sides, and is more than it seems at its core.

Opponents of Prop B will generally tell you one of two things: A) They are against setting the precedent of regulating the agricultural markets of growing animals, or B) The wording of Prop B will hamper legitimate dog breeders in Missouri, while doing nothing to actually diminish the problem of abusive and cruel dog breeding practices in Missouri.

Supporters of Prop B will generally tell you that Missouri, as the “Puppy Mill Capital of the US”, needs to intervene on the behalf of abused animals that are being kept in inadequate facilities with inadequate care, and horrible breeding conditions. They will also tell you that it is not their intention to begin an agricultural reform in Missouri based on this bill.

I agree with both sides. I think the supporters of Prop B have a point when they say that Missouri needs to do something about the horrible commercial breeders we have in our state. I agree with the opponents of Prop B that this particular bill will not do anything to really aid that. I also agree that the supporters of Prop B have no intention of using it as a precedent to force cattle breeders and pig farmers in Missouri into extremely unfavorable positions, that might actually ruin the agricultural industry in Missouri.

But, that doesn’t mean that the door won’t be opened for more extremist animal rights groups, like say… People for the Eating of Tasty Animals, to step in and start pushing initiatives into Missouri law that could ruin our agricultural markets.

Why am I writing an article on a Missouri issue instead of my usual national topics? Because I think its a great example of a topic that needs open debate and careful consideration, one that can seem simple at face value but could get much deeper when you begin to analyze it. Its also the only issue on the ballot coming up that I’m not sure which way I’ll vote.

Are there any issues you guys think are deeper than they appear coming up on the ballot?

Remember there’s only 2 weeks between now and the vote! I suggest taking a little bit of time to familiarize yourself with whats on the ballots in your area.

Here is a great resource for it: Ballotpedia

Published by M.A. Brotherton

M.A. Brotherton is a writer, blogger, artist, and fat-kid from the suburbs of Kansas City, Missouri. He’s tasted a little bit of everything the Midwest has to offer, ranging from meth-tweaking rednecks in massive underground cave complexes to those legendary amber waves of grain. When he’s not writing, he spends most of his time screwing around on the internet.

2 thoughts on “So what’s the deal with Prop B?”

  1. Lyadonna says:

    I have been wondering about this Prop B thing myself (and at first even thought some guy just used the wrong lettering on the sign and meant Prop 8).

    I am very much a dog lover and never, ever want to see animals hurt, however I am also very much against too much government interference. Especially into business.

    I am wondering what the individuals in the dog breeding business propose as an alternative to this proposition. I don’t really know enough about the business to be able to develop a workable solution (and I expect the lawmakers don’t know any more than I do).

    1. M.A. Brotherton says:

      That’s the boat I’m in. The breeders I know personally are small scale, they have a dog that they find a stud for and they do 1 litter a year, and other than that, the dog is a pet in the family.

      In my research, I’ve found that the animal rights organizations that are against it repeatedly say it won’t solve the problems, and that the dog breeders that already take care of the dogs will be the only ones hurt by it, but I’m not sure how they could be hurt if they’re doing what they need to be doing for their dogs.

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