Blog, On Writing

Lessons Learned about Writing and Human Interaction from Crash by Wright and Platt

 

I made a horrible mistake. You see, I recently read Crash by David Wright and Sean Platt. That wasn’t the mistake. Hear me out.

The book… is just amazing. The characters, the story, the horrifyingly depressing ending that will leave you a broken miserable wreck for weeks. It is exactly the kind of book that I read and go, “I need to work harder. I need to hone my craft so that I can write like this.”

I absolutely loved this book. I am recommending it to all of you, right now. Go and read it. I’ll be here when you get back.

Okay, so maybe you should just go read some of the reviews. You’ll notice a trend.

Here’s a mild version:

“Maybe it won’t ruin your life, but your day for sure. I’m all for fictitious children in peril (I am a Wright and Platt fan, after all), but in Crash, these guys actually made me cry. Cry!” Stacy Claflin

The book is powerful in all the right ways, including the ways that make you sob. It was the first book since A Dog’s Purpose that made me feel something in my frozen, shattered heart.

 

Here’s my Mistake:

I told one of my co-workers about how much I enjoyed it. She asked me what I’d been reading, and I told her. She’s an avid reader. She’s even ready my books. So, of course, she picked it up and read it over the weekend.

One small difference between me and her.

She has kids.

Without giving anything away– The end of this book is so awesome that you would hunt me down and murder me for ruining it for you– the book is especially hard on parents.

 

So, first thing this morning, she yelled at me.

“I HATE THE ENDING OF THAT BOOK!”

This was followed by her, nearly in tears, explaining to me how awesome the book was and how it had torn her apart. I implored her to leave a review. Writers need reviews. It’s the fuel for our writer mojo.

 

She loved it. She hated it. It was a perfect book.

 

Of course, the lesson I need to learn is to a) Avoid awkward emotional situations at work by never, ever talking to anyone about anything, and b) Remember to buy paperbacks of Crash to deposit in places where my enemies can find them.

 

Because they won’t be able to put it down and it will cause them emotional suffering.

 

You have been warned, world. You have been warned.

Published by M.A. Brotherton

M.A. Brotherton is a writer, blogger, artist, and fat-kid from the suburbs of Kansas City, Missouri. He’s tasted a little bit of everything the Midwest has to offer, ranging from meth-tweaking rednecks in massive underground cave complexes to those legendary amber waves of grain. When he’s not writing, he spends most of his time screwing around on the internet.