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The Long Walk – A Book Review

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I have to admit, I would not have ever read King’s The Long Walk if it wasn’t for Jason’s consistent recommendation. I should have known better than to wait on a book so loved by one of my favorite fellow bloggers. (You should read Jason’s blog Love Letters and Suicide Notes)

Even as someone who has never been a big fan of King’s fiction, and less even of the Richard Bachman books, I was hesitant, though.

I shouldn’t have been.

The Long Walk

Let me just start off by saying that if you are tired and depressed, The Long Walk might just push you over the edge into the fields of insanity and into the hard embrace of seppuku. I’m not exaggerating. It is a testament to the writing that you can begin reading this book as a perfectly rational, happy, possibly energetic human being and come out the other end completely exhausted and contemplating your own demise.

You can’t help it.

The book is just too well written to allow you to get away from feeling the tiring pull of the Walk.

I don’t want to get into details, because thinking about them brings back that weary tread again, but I will give you this:

Stephen King is a master of his craft. If it is the writer’s job to not only tell you a story but to make you feel and experience it, then damn, he does his job better than any writer I’ve ever read.

It just so happens that the story he’s telling this time is that of young men walking at a steady 4 miles per hour down the east coast highways, starting at the US/Canada Border and ending when only one of them has gone without buying their ticket.

It’s a long, grueling, mentally destroying walk, and the reader feels ever freaking minute of it on the text.

Enjoy at your own risk.

 

Pick up Stephen King’s The Long Walk from Amazon or, give it a listen from Audible. (Affiliate Links)

Published by M.A. Brotherton

M.A. Brotherton is a writer, blogger, artist, and fat-kid from the suburbs of Kansas City, Missouri. He’s tasted a little bit of everything the Midwest has to offer, ranging from meth-tweaking rednecks in massive underground cave complexes to those legendary amber waves of grain. When he’s not writing, he spends most of his time screwing around on the internet.

6 thoughts on “The Long Walk – A Book Review”

  1. Lindaknoles says:

    This has always been one of my favorites bu Stephen King.  Of course, I am a huge Stephen King fan.  You should read his new one, 7/22/63.

    1. M.A. Brotherton says:

      I’ll add it to my list, but I might need some time before diving into another King novel.

  2. Joshua L. Brotherton says:

    Do you even know what a “perfectly rational, happy, possibly
    energetic human being” looks like?  I am going to agree with you though.  Stephen King is undeniably one of the greatest modern masters of the literary craft.  There are people who may not enjoy his work, but no one can deny his ability.  Your review of this book captures my personal problem with many of King’s works.  King is too good at what he does.  He draws the reader in so fully that by the time they realize what he has wrought, they find themselves in a place so oppressive that even his happy endings leave scars on the reader.  Reading King has never been escapist…more it is a struggle to escape from him.

    1. M.A. Brotherton says:

      Really, it is an infection that gets inside, almost like thorny vines spreading out in your soul and sticking barbs into the meat of your sanity.

      I’m not sure if that’s good or bad, really.

      For me, King’s fiction is a bit hard to push through, because of the emotional slam dance of his writing, but I love his non-fiction. He knows his craft inside and out and it’s great to see his perspective on things.

      I think I also understand why he creates personas to write as. I think I understand that well, now.

  3. Jason Benoit says:

    I am so glad you enjoyed it. I could give you a list of other King novels that are as good or better. He really can tell a story like no other, at least in my opinion. If you do decide to read 11/22/63 let me know I have it on my kindle and I can loan it to you if you are ever interested. By the by, you have almost inspired me to start reviewing the books I read. I really like this part of your blog. 

    1. M.A. Brotherton says:

      I might have to hit you up on that a little ways down the road. I think if I read another King book right now, I’d end up lying in a pool of my own tears and fried chicken waiting for my personal demons to tear me apart.

      Which is the entire temptation of it to begin with I think.

      I actually have considered creating a separate blog for doing book reviews, but I’m not sure how fast I can keep up with my reading. I like writing them, though, and honestly, they seem to go over well in general.

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